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Jobs Go at Flybmi After Collapse, Airline’s Administrators Confirm

Written by: Keith Tully

Reviewed: Tuesday 19th February, 2019

Jobs go at FlybmiAdministrators appointed to the airline business Flybmi in recent days have confirmed that a majority of the company’s 376 employees have already been made redundant.

The airline ceased trading as of February 16th and has been forced to end the employment of several hundred members of staff in Germany, Sweden and Belgium, as well as in the UK.

Flybmi had been operating 17 regional jet airplanes and providing flights to its customers along routes heading in and out of 25 different cities across Europe, including Bristol, Newcastle, Aberdeen and the East Midlands.

The company, which had been based in the East Midlands, was operating a total of 600 flights a week prior to its collapse.

Thousands of customers are understood to have been left out of pocket as a result of Flybmi’s entry into administration, with its administrators urging people to seek refunds through their payment card companies where possible or to make claims against their travel insurance if their flights were cancelled.

“We are taking all necessary steps to ensure customers, staff and suppliers are supported through the administration process,” said Tony Nygate, one of the administrators recently appointed to Flybmi.  

“Our job is to maximise recoveries and minimise distress for all parties, acting as smoothly and swiftly as possible.

“Customers can find information on the flybmi website regarding the steps they need to take to apply for a refund from their payment provider or travel company.

“We are also working with the Company’s employees to provide them with guidance on how to make a claim for monies which may be due to them. In addition, we are contacting suppliers to explain how to apply for monies owed to them.”

Statements given by Flybmi after it was forced to call in administrators on February 16th cited “recent spikes in fuel and carbon costs” and “uncertainty created by the Brexit process” as contributing factors in its demise.

Brexit-related issues were blamed for the company being unable to secure flight contracts in Europe and to a lack of confidence in its potential to continue flying to and from destinations in the EU.

Keith Tully

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Keith Tully
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Keith has been involved in Business Rescue since 1992, during which time he’s worked for both independent and national firms. His specialties include company restructuring matters and negotiating with HMRC on his clients behalf.

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